Birth control is related to sex, and we should talk about that

“Respectability politics” is a concept that plagues many social justice movements. Members of marginalized groups feel the need to prove that they are worthy of certain rights they want to be granted in order to win victory in mainstream society. It’s an understandable impulse, but it often ends up hurting a cause as well as the people fighting for it. Irin Carmon takes this on in the context of birth control access and makes a strong case against the overemphasis on medically necessary contraception:  Continue reading “Birth control is related to sex, and we should talk about that”

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Weekend reading

A pro-choice activist has some fun at her local Hobby Lobby.

Dahlia Lithwick on how the Supreme Court “chose not to see women this term, or at least not real women, with real challenges, and opted instead to offer extra protections to the delicate women of their imaginary worlds.”

Jezebel skewers a ludicrous Esquire piece on the newly-found desirability of 42-year-old women.

Birth control saves a lot of money.

Sad, but not surprising: the NSA has been retaining a lot of irrelevant information about innocent people and spying on Muslim-Americans.

Kelly Williams Brown expands on the right’s caricature of young women as “Beyonce voters.”

 

Weekend reading

Kyle Buchanan at Vulture looks at the trend of casting women as mothers in age-inappropriate ways, and what it would look like if Hollywood did the same thing with men.

All of the NSA revelations to date in one chart.

10 ways men can combat sexist entitlement.

The Hobby Lobby ruling offers yet another reason why we shouldn’t have an employer-based health insurance system.

A map of which countries subsidize birth control pills or offer them for free.

Despite protestations that the Hobby Lobby ruling was narrow, the Supreme Court has ordered lower courts to rehear cases on denying coverage for any type of contraception.

 

Corporations win over women: Hobby Lobby roundup

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The Supreme Court struck a blow against reproductive rights yesterday in its ruling in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby that Katie McDonough sums up as “five male justices ruled that thousands of female employees should rightfully be subjected to the whims of their employers.” It’s infuriating that medical decisions that should be made between women and their doctors are subjected to religious beliefs grounded in junk science. Women need access to the full range of contraception options, and imbuing corporations with the religious rights of a person and inserting those beliefs into women’s health care decisions is unacceptable.  Continue reading “Corporations win over women: Hobby Lobby roundup”

The birth control coverage mandate: our work isn’t done

photo via webmd.com
photo via webmd.com

A few years ago, I went to the doctor about a pain in my leg that was so intense it would wake me in the middle of the night. Tests revealed that it was a blood clot, and with no other risk factors my doctor determined it was caused by birth control pills. I had to stop taking them immediately, and thankfully a combination of medicine and stopping the pills cleared it up. But it left me with very limited effective birth control options as any return to hormonal birth control methods could potentially be life-threatening. Despite a clear medical reason for switching to an IUD, I still had to wade through obstacles thrown up by my insurance company, and my doctor wouldn’t even give me an appointment until it was clear how much my insurance would cover. I was lucky to be able to get access to the care I needed eventually, but for a lot of women it can be even more challenging, time consuming and costly. Continue reading “The birth control coverage mandate: our work isn’t done”

It pays to have more women on the Supreme Court

photo via Talking Points Memo
photo via Talking Points Memo

The proponents of a colorblind, gender-blind, whatever else-blind outlook on the world don’t just undermine attempts to identify and rectify discrimination. They also ignore the valuable perspective one can bring from experiencing American culture as someone other than a straight white man.

Supreme Court Justice Sotomayor was pilloried in some corners for her acknowledgement of this reality during her confirmation process. She pointed out that “ a wise Latina woman with the richness of her experiences would more often than not reach a better conclusion than a white male who hasn’t lived that life,” and then had to listen to a bunch of white men tell her how racist she was.

 

Continue reading “It pays to have more women on the Supreme Court”